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133rd Medical Group Trains with Children's Hospital

The 133rd Airlift Wing hosted an event that brought in specialists from Children’s Hospital of St. Paul, Minn. to train members of the Wing’s Medical Squadron during Sept. drill.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Paul Santikko/Released)

The 133rd Airlift Wing hosted an event that brought in specialists from Children’s Hospital of St. Paul, Minn. to train members of the Wing’s Medical Squadron during Sept. drill. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Paul Santikko/Released)

The 133rd Airlift Wing hosted an event that brought in specialists from Children’s Hospital of St. Paul, Minn. to train members of the Wing’s Medical Squadron during Sept. drill.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Paul Santikko/Released)

The 133rd Airlift Wing hosted an event that brought in specialists from Children’s Hospital of St. Paul, Minn. to train members of the Wing’s Medical Squadron during Sept. drill. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Paul Santikko/Released)

21 Sept 2014 -- The 133rd Airlift Wing hosted an event that brought in specialists from Children's Hospital of St. Paul, Minn. to train members of the Wing's Medical Squadron during Saturday and Sunday of September drill.

Children's Hospital utilizes their Mobile training center that is brought on site to educate on the topic of best practices when dealing with traumatic injuries in pediatric care. Led by Doctors Karen Mathias and Paula Fink-Kocken of Children's Hospital, their team of pediatric specialists uses life-like training aids to provide lessons on various trauma scenarios that allowed members of the Wing to gain crucial hands-on experience when dealing with children.

"It is a unique environment that we can provide for the Wing to train in that they normally wouldn't get a chance to on a regular basis" said Dr. Karen Mathias of Children's.

Maj. Chris Wolf of the 133rd Medical Squadron coordinated with Children's to bring their team on base to provide this specialized training.

Typically, the 133rd Airlift Wing would only be treating healthy adults in a military setting, said Wolf.  Since they respond to state and local missions, it is vital to enable Airmen with the best set of skills and training that allow them to properly treat children as well.

Size being one of the obvious differences between children and adults, there are many other important factors that come into play when treating a traumatic injury in pediatrics.

"Children respond more quickly to treatment, but transversely deteriorate more quickly than that of an adult - it is always on a sliding scale that has to be considered when dealing with a child," said Dr. Fink-Kocken.

This was the first time the 133rd Airlift Wing has hosted an event with Children's Hospital.

"The value of what is gained while training with outside organizations is immense, and Children's has done an excellent job with our Airmen," said Wolf.